Lonken Lonkin Lonke

Lonken Lonkin Lonke

The handwritten name on the front page of the passport looks roughly like this.

or . Transliterating the family name, one obtains Lonkin, if we ignore the final character. The 'i' would be sounded like 'ee' in seen. 'kin' is a common Russian name ending, as in Pushkin. The feminine form is 'kina'. The final character is a 'ch'. translates to 'lawn'. In the portions of the passport written by officials, the name is always written Lonke.

Recently (June 2020) I became aware of an Israeli cousin named Gali Ron who has shared a family tree with earlier Lonke relatives and their descendants. The earlier people were all living in Grodno. Josef, Solomon's father, is called Josel. Gali is a descendant of Zilpah Lonke.

Aron Lonke
Birko Lonke 1788-1852
Simkel Lonke 1822-1852
Yankel Lonke 1850 -
Shloima Lonke 1800-1854
Josel Lonke 1832-
+Minek Lonke 1838-1911
Solomon Landowne 1857-1934
+Anna Rachla Sulcas 1861-1931
children
Harris (Aharon Tzvil) Lando 1866-1939
+Minnie Lachman 1872-1934
children
Helen Lonke 1868-1941
+Harry Kalisky 1866-1938
children
Abram Lonke 1834-
Pinkhus Lonke 1848 -
+Yenta
Josel Lonke 1873-1940
+Rachel 1882-1942
Solomon Lonke 1876-
+Ester Kokhman 1878-
children
Aron Lonke 1877-
Dveira Lonke 1880-
Zilpah Lonke 1882-
+Yaakov Mosha Shvarts 1874-1944
children
+Malka Rivkind 1860-1940
Yakov Lonke 1893-1941
+Rachel Gurevitz 1890-1941
children
Shebach Shola Lonke 1900-1944
+Faniga Kalich 1904-
children

As it happens, lonke is yiddish for meadow or lawn and is mentioned in a song Yidl Mitn Fidl from a famous 1936 movie by the same name, filmed in Kazimierz Dolny, Republic of Poland, about 150 miles southwest of Grodno, which was also in the Republic of Poland at that time. That song page has the word in hebrew which I have copied below.

Also there is a village in Poland, about 180 miles WSW of Grodno, called Łąkie in Polish and Lonke in German.
david@landowne.org